Cochrane News

Pretplati se na Cochrane News feed
Osvježeno: prije 37 minuta 19 sekundi

Seoul Colloquium news

čet, 09/22/2016 - 04:00

Cochrane Colloquia are our annual flagship events, bringing together Cochrane contributors from around the world to discuss, develop and promote Cochrane, and help shape its future.

The 2016 Cochrane Colloquium will be held in Seoul, South Korea from 23-27 October. For full information regarding the Colloquium, please visit the website.

  • Key information
  • Latest news
  • Plenaries, speakers and symposia
Key information:Latest news:
  • Sign-up for the Anne Anderson Walk
    The walk around Gyeongbokgung (Gyoengbok Palace) is a fundraising event for the Anne Anderson Award fund. The walk is on Wednesday 26 October at 14:30. The tour guides have been provided gratis. If you would like to sign-up for the walk, you can do so here. To donate to the award fund, click here.

  • 2016 Annual General Meeting
    Cochrane’s Annual General Meeting will be held on Tuesday 25 October, at the Colloquium. Find out more, here.

  • Sign-up now open for the full Colloquium schedule
    Sign-up for all the sessions you want to attend and create your own personal schedule for the Colloquium! You can also export the schedule to your online calendar. We'll be launching the Colloquium app in early October that will sync with your personal schedule. Details of the poster sessions are being finalised now and will be available from 21 September. 

  • Very limited room availability at the Grand Hilton
    As of 25 August, we have been advised that very few rooms are available. We have removed the online reservation page - please contact the Hilton directly (via reservation.grandseoul@hilton.com 
     or T +82-2-2287-8428) to check if there are any rooms available.
     
  • Registration closes on 10 October
    Don't miss out on a chance to learn more about Cochrane and evidence-based health care. Registration closes on 10 OctoberClick here for the registration rates.
Plenaries, speakers and symposia:Plenary 1: Overdiagnosis and overtreatment in health care

In this session, the role of evidence-based health care and systematic reviews in limiting overdiagnosis and oversue will be discussed, including realignment of disease definition; quantification and monitoring of overdiagnosis; sensitisation of health professionals and patients; provision of balanced information on risk and benefits intervention; and the implications for Cochrane.

Speakers:

  • Alexandra Barratt, Professor of Public Health, School of Public Health, University of Sydney

  • Rita F. Redberg, Editor, JAMA Internal Medicine. Professor of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of California, San Francisco

  • Jenny Doust, Professor of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences and Medicine, Bond University

Plenary 2: Challenges and different approaches to improve the quality, timeliness and usability of Cochrane Reviews

The speakers in the plenary session have been asked to describe their experiences in making challenging decisions regarding the quality and usability of Cochrane reviews. Different perspectives and lively debate will be sought with particular focus on potential initiatives that are being explored and are consistent with the CEU vision for high quality and timely Cochrane Reviews that meets the needs of end-users and informs clinical care and health policy.

Speakers:

  • James Thomas, Project Transform, Cochrane. Director of the EPPI-Centre’s Reviews Facility, Department of Health, England

  • Karla Soares-Weiser, Deputy Editor in Chief, Cochrane Library & Cochrane Innovations

  • Marguerite Koster, External Member, Cochrane Steering Group

  • Harriet MacLehose, Senior Editor, Cochrane Library

  • Claire Glenton, Director, Cochrane Norway

Plenary 3: Data transparency: where are we and what can we get?

Pressure to increase transparency of data in clinical research is growing as scientific academies, regulatory agencies, funders and international organisations join the call for more data transparency. In this session, recent issues in the open data movement, data access policies and its impact on health care are discussed. Some examples of the impact of lack of transparency in East Asia will highlighted.

Speakers:

  • Kay Dickersin, Director, Cochrane United States. Director, Johns Hopkins Center for Clinical Trials & Evidence Synthesis

  • Byung Joo Park, Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine

  • Lesley Stewart, Director, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, University of York

  • Rintaro Mori, Director, Cochrane Japan. Head of Department National Center for Child Health and Department of Clinical Epidemiology

Annual Cochrane Lecture: Four challenges for EBM and Cochrane’s future

Since the term evidence based medicine (EBM) was coined over 20 years ago it has had a remarkable global influence. But EBM is not a static set of concepts, set in stone tablets in the 1990s; it is a young and evolving discipline. The fundamental concept of systematic reviews – providing a periodic summary of all controlled trials to aid clinical care – may have changed little since the birth of Cochrane. However, how to best provide and apply these in practice continues to develop.

In this year’s Cochrane Lecture, Paul Glasziou will propose four areas requiring renewed or ongoing attention:

  1. Improve dialogue between “evidologists” and clinicians
  2. Treatment is the patient’s decision: support and promote shared decision making
  3. Take non-drug interventions as seriously as pharmaceuticals
  4. Sustain investment in automating evidence synthesis 

Speaker:

  • Paul Glasziou, Professor, Evidence-Based Medicine at Bond University; Chair, International Society for Evidence-Based Health Care

#CochraneTech Symposium: The new ecosystem for evidence synthesis

Cochrane’s technological innovations are set to transform the way evidence for health is created and used. Join us at the #CochraneTech Symposium in Seoul to discover first-hand the emerging Cochrane ecosystem for evidence synthesis.

We’re preparing an exciting morning of talks and discussion centred around how Cochrane is using its technology to help both prepare systematic reviews more efficiently but also better deliver outputs to our end-users. The #CochraneTech Symposium is the premier event for those interested in the application and integration of existing and emerging technologies in the production of Cochrane systematic reviews and evidence synthesis in health care.

Since the inaugural #CochraneTech Symposium in Québec City in 2013 several ambitious technological strategies have been pursued by Cochrane, and we welcome you to join us in exploring this new ecosystem for evidence synthesis.

Methods Symposium: Living Systematic Reviews: Methods, Opportunities and Challenges

Living systematic reviews, as online summaries of healthcare research that are updated as new research becomes available, offer exciting possibilities in the new evidence ecosystem. Momentum is building around the living systematic review concept: a number of approaches are being piloted and Cochrane is at the forefront of these efforts. Living systematic reviews differ from traditional systematic reviews in several ways that have important implications for review methods and processes, affecting authors, editors and publishers. 

At this interactive symposium, we will explore what living systematic reviews actually are and their implications for Cochrane. Participants will hear from those who have been piloting living systematic review methods and will be invited to contribute their expertise as we explore the implications of LSRs for review methods and review production processes, plus the enablers within Cochrane to support their introduction.

Knowledge Translation (KT) Symposium

In 2016 Cochrane is embarking on the development of a Knowledge Translation (KT) Strategy, which will inform, facilitate and coordinate KT activities within Cochrane. We hope this strategy will scope knowledge translation activities for Cochrane, build on the Strategy to 2020 goals and provide a framework and co-ordination to support those who are undertaking knowledge translation activities in Cochrane. This framework will guide our knowledge translation work and ensure quality of outputs. We hope to establish mechanisms for better coordination of knowledge translation work within Cochrane so that organisational learning in this area flows through Cochrane.

In this symposium we will be presenting the current draft of Cochrane’s KT strategy. There will be brief presentations on the work around the strategy, an opportunity for discussion and input into further development of the strategy and the implementation plans accompanying it and what it will mean for knowledge translation in Cochrane.

Look forward to seeing you in Seoul in October!

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Music therapy strikes a chord

sri, 09/21/2016 - 18:15

Reposted with permission from Cochrane Australia

A trio of music therapy reviews featured in last year’s Australian top 100 Cochrane Library downloads, with Music Therapy for depression coming in at number 7, Music Therapy for people with spectrum disorder at number 40 and Music Therapy for people with dementia at 76. Recently a new update of Music interventions for cancer patients took centre stage and made headlines around the world, finding that music may have beneficial effects on anxiety, pain, fatigue, depression and quality of life for people with cancer.

‘It’s great to see these reviews are the subject of so much interest and discussion,’ says Emma Donoghue, resident music therapist and evidence officer with Cochrane Australia. ‘Sometimes we find that people confuse music therapy with music education or entertainment, or perhaps think it involves mysterious crystals and incense. But these reviews help us highlight that music therapy is a well-established, research-based profession that supports the health and well-being of children and adults of every age, often at very difficult times in their lives. It’s an amazing profession to be a part of.’

Emma graduated from the University of Melbourne’s Masters of Music Therapy program two years ago, gaining the theoretical grounding and practical clinical placement experience necessary to pursue a career in the field. ‘Music therapists are trained to use music to support people to improve their health, functioning and wellbeing. You need to cover a lot of complex theoretical and practical territory to become accredited’ Emma explains. ‘But in simple terms, you look at particular age groups, conditions and settings and the different types of interventions that can meet the needs of individuals. In a session, a music therapist chooses and adapts music experiences to meet the needs, preferences and ability levels of the people that they are working with. Some of these music experiences include listening to music, singing familiar songs, playing instruments, improvising music on instruments or voice, song writing, moving to music, or discussing someone’s emotional reaction or meaning attached to a particular song or improvisation.’

‘The music is just one part of the equation though, as music therapy happens within the context of a therapeutic relationship. So you need to have essential skills to build these relationships, like rapport-building, empathy and counselling skills. What a person needs can change from session to session, or even within a single session, so the idea is to build a toolkit of music therapy techniques that you can draw on to meet the client’s changing needs in the moment. Throughout the training, your theoretical knowledge and practical skills are put into practice in various clinical placements within hospitals, schools, aged and palliative care, and community settings. These really give you a sense of the challenges and rewards of working with different populations, and sometimes they’re not what you’d expect.’

‘One of my early placements was at a respite care facility for people with progressive neurological conditions like MS and Motor Neurone Disease. I anticipated that this might be a sad or depressing experience, but despite the emotional challenges, it turned out be really rewarding to go in and do something positive to help each person in some way. And not with the usual interventions like feeding, medication and hygiene, but with something that recognised and connected with them as a person and enabled them to be something other than a long-term patient. This is so important given people can feel their identities are reduced to just this person in a hospital bed. The Australian Music Therapy Association just launched a campaign called RMTS change lives, which features six short animations highlighting the kind of work that we do with different populations. The first two focus on babies and children with disabilities, with more to follow in areas like mental health, aged care and palliative care. This is a great way to see how music therapists make a difference to individual patients and families alike.’

This focus on individual, personalised and responsive treatment is what differentiates the field of music therapy from music medicine, which is another area of increasing interest to researchers. The latter focuses more on the physiological impacts of music and does not involve a therapist. So for example a recent review in The Lancet looked at 7,000 patients who listened to pre-recorded music before, during and after surgery and found the experience of listening to music could actually lower the activity of the nervous system and reduce pulse rate, breathing and blood pressure. They also found pain, anxiety and even the need for pain medication were reduced.

Interestingly, the latest update of the Cochrane review of Music interventions for cancer patients includes and compares both music medicine and music therapy studies. It suggest that music therapy interventions lead to more consistent results across studies than music medicine studies, which is likely due to the fact that music therapists are trained to meet the patient’s in-the-moment needs when offering live music, rather than offering a limited selection of pre-recorded music which mightn’t be suitable for all patients. The review also found that participants overwhelmingly preferred the music therapy sessions because of the personal attention and care, the creativity of the interactive music making, and the opportunity for emotional expression through singing and playing instruments.

This resonates with Emma and her experiences of music therapy to date. ‘I worked with an older lady with MS, who was weak, in pain, and had a lot of trouble sleeping. Each week I’d visit and she would request different music – be it bright and sparky or something romantic. Sometimes she would fall asleep while I played and sang her preferred songs, which was great as she was so tired yet had trouble sleeping. She would say to me ‘Even if I’m asleep, just keep playing dear. When you’re here I just feel better.’’

Monday, October 3, 2016

Translated Cochrane evidence

pet, 09/16/2016 - 04:00

Bringing you Cochrane evidence in 13 different languages
 
Making Cochrane evidence accessible to non-English speakers is a priority for us. More than 4,000 translations of Cochrane Review plain language summaries/abstracts have been published so far this year. Translation activities are led by local Cochrane groups and their translator communities, the majority of which are volunteer based. Due to the length of Cochrane Reviews, our teams focus on the abstract and or the Plain Language Summary.
 
Find Cochrane evidence in different languages: Cochrane evidence is currently translated into 13 languages: Croatian, French, German, Japanese, Korean, Malay, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Simplified Chinese, Spanish, Tamil and Traditional Chinese. Each language has its own version of cochrane.org; you can view translations by clicking on the languages that appear across the top of each page.

Cochrane Podcasts in different language: Cochrane podcasts offer a short summary of a recent Cochrane review and have been recorded in 33 languages.
 
Most translated Reviews: The links below will take you to the English language version of our most translated Reviews. Languages these Reviews have been translated into are listed across the top of the page. To read the Review in another language, simply click on the language and it will take you to the translation.
· Interventions for preventing obesity in children
· Electronic cigarettes for smoking cessation and reduction
· Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold
· Continuous support for women during childbirth
 
Our translation achievements for the first half of 2016 in an infographic:

Monday, November 21, 2016

Feature Review: Population-level interventions in government jurisdictions for dietary sodium reduction

čet, 09/15/2016 - 17:52

National government initiatives have the potential to achieve population-wide reduction in salt intake

In almost all countries worldwide, most people eat too much salt. This can cause high blood pressure, which can lead to health problems, such as heart disease and stroke. To reduce the amount of salt eaten, governments in many countries have developed national salt reduction initiatives. These initiatives may be individually oriented, such as providing education about salt, or structurally oriented to improve or offset the deficiencies which prevent people from obtaining food with lower salt. As the number of population-based initiatives to reduce salt rise worldwide, it is important for policy-makers to identify which population-level intervention are impactful and cost-effective.

A team of Cochrane authors based in Australia and Canada worked with Cochrane Public Health to examine whether national salt reduction initiatives have been effective in reducing the amount of salt consumed in those populations. 15 national initiatives, including more than 260,0000 were included, with 10 initiatives providing sufficient date for quantitative analysis. These were mostly conducted in high income countries. The quality of the data was rated to be very low given the nature of the interventions does not lend to using controlled study design.

Population-level interventions in government jurisdictions for dietary sodium reduction have the potential to result in population-wide reductions in salt intake from pre-intervention to post-intervention, particularly if they have more than one intervention activity and incorporate interventions of a structural nature (e.g. large-scale efforts to lower the salt content of food products at the time of production), and particularly amongst men. Implementation of future initiatives should embed more effective means of evaluation to help us better understand the variation in the effects.

This Cochrane Review excluded a larger number of national salt reduction strategies because the data lacked pre and/or post data points which are needed to examine the impact of the intervention. There were 15 included initiatives the Review but with a wide variation in the elements they included, as well as the quality of evidence in their evaluation. For these reasons, it is difficult to interpret the current evidence and we warrants more research. This Review provides some evidence that national sodium reduction initiatives that are multi-component and include activities of a structural nature, such as policies to lower the salt levels in food in specific settings, appear to be more effective than single-component initiatives, such as information campaigns.

Read the full Cochrane Review
Visit the Cochrane Public Health website

Friday, October 7, 2016

Cochrane Podcasts

pon, 09/05/2016 - 04:00

Cochrane podcasts deliver the latest Cochrane evidence in an easy to access audio format, allowing you to stay up to date on newly published reviews wherever you are.

Each Cochrane podcast offers a short summary of a recent Cochrane review from the authors themselves. They have been recorded in 33 languages and are brief, allowing everyone from healthcare professionals to patients and families to hear the latest Cochrane evidence in under five minutes.

You can view and search our entire catalogue of hundreds of podcasts or subscribe via iTunes for the latest updates.

Whether you listen in your office, on your daily commute or even in the bath, Cochrane podcasts offer a quick and easy way to keep up with the latest evidence from the Cochrane Library.

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

What are systematic reviews?

pet, 08/26/2016 - 00:27

 "What are systematic reviews?"

If you’re a Cochrane contributor and have ever attempted to explain Cochrane’s work to someone, chances are you’ve tried to answer this question. And if you’re reading this because you’re new to Cochrane and the work we do, you may be wondering about this too.

Thanks to a team of creative colleagues from Cochrane Consumers and Communication, we’re pleased to share a video resource which answers this question clearly and simply for people who may not be familiar with the concept of systematic reviews: what they are, how researchers prepare them, and why they’re an important part of making informed decisions about health - for everyone. You can find this video on Cochrane’s YouTube channel, and we hope you’ll share and spread the word about the importance of evidence!

 

Wednesday, November 7, 2018

What are systematic reviews?

pet, 08/26/2016 - 00:27

 

"What are systematic reviews?"

If you’re a Cochrane contributor and have ever attempted to explain Cochrane’s work to someone, chances are you’ve tried to answer this question. And if you’re reading this because you’re new to Cochrane and the work we do, you may be wondering about this too.

Thanks to a team of creative colleagues from Cochrane Consumers and Communication, we’re pleased to share a video resource which answers this question clearly and simply for people who may not be familiar with the concept of systematic reviews: what they are, how researchers prepare them, and why they’re an important part of making informed decisions about health - for everyone. You can find this video on Cochrane’s YouTube channel, and we hope you’ll share and spread the word about the importance of evidence!

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Cochrane evidence on Tumblr

pon, 08/01/2016 - 16:16

Browse through our Tumblr account and get a visual dose of Cochrane evidence!

Tumblr is a microblogging social networking website – a place where people post images and animated graphics. On our Cochrane Tumblr account, you can view visual summaries of Cochrane evidence.

If you have a Tumblr account, you can follow us to add Cochrane evidence to your feed. If you don’t have a Tumblr account, just stop by and browse by health area or language – we have posts in seven different languages!

Cochrane Tumblr: https://cochraneblogshots.tumblr.com/ 

Tuesday, October 25, 2016

2019 Journal Impact Factor for Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews is 7.890

čet, 06/30/2016 - 10:54

 The 2019 Journal Citation Report (JCR) has just been released by Clarivate Analytics, and we are delighted to announce that Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) Journal Impact Factor is now 7.890.

This is an increase on the 2018 Journal Impact Factor, which was 7.755.

The CDSR Journal Impact Factor is calculated by taking the total number of citations in a given year to all Cochrane Reviews published in the past 2 years and dividing that number by the total number of Reviews published in the past 2 years. It is a useful metric for measuring the strength of a journal by how often its publications are cited in scholarly articles.

Some highlights of the CDSR 2019 Journal Impact Factor include:

  • The CDSR is ranked 10 of the 165 journals in the Medicine, General & Internal category
  • The CDSR received 67,763 cites in the 2019 Journal Impact Factor period, compared with 67,607 in 2018
  • The 5-Year Journal Impact Factor is 7.974 compared with 7.949 in 2018

The main Journal Impact Report and the Cochrane Review Group reports will be delivered in August 2020.

 

Monday, June 29, 2020

International Clinical Trials' Day 2019

čet, 05/19/2016 - 04:00

International Clinical Trials' Day is celebrated in 2019 on 20 May marking the day in 1747 on which James Lind is believed to have begun the first known controlled trial, comparing different treatments for scurvy which was common among sailors in the British Royal Navy. (Watch a video explaining the trial to see history in the making.) International Clinical Trials' Day seeks to raise awareness of the importance of research to health care, and draw attention to ways in which the research can become more relevant to practice.

Learn about Cochrane systematic reviews and how clinical trials are used:


Find other relevant information and resources on Twitter by using the hashtag #ICTD2019.

Monday, May 20, 2019

International Clinical Trials' Day 2017

čet, 05/19/2016 - 04:00

International Clinical Trials' Day is celebrated around the world each year on or close to 20 May, commemorating the day in 1747 on which James Lind began the first known controlled trial, comparing different treatments for scurvy then in common use among sailors in the British Royal Navy. (Watch a video explaining the trial to see history in the making.) International Clinical Trials' Day seeks to raise awareness of the importance of research to health care, and draw attention to ways in which the research can become more relevant to practice.

The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN)helps to co-ordinate the annual commemoration, providing a focal point for international events, meetings, debates, and other celebrations of clinical research. The highlight of each year is a series of public lectures and discussions, held in a different European city. The 2017 celebrations are taking place on May 19th in Lisbon, Portugal. A range of speakers will present a variety of relevant topics, including ‘Data sharing and reuse: attitudes and practices in multinational clinical research’, with healthcare professionals and researchers from across Europe in attendance.

Learn about Cochrane systematic reviews and how clinical trials are used:


As part of our own commemoration of International Clinical Trials’ Day, Cochrane is highlighting a series of recent reviews using clinical study data and regulatory reports, as well as published reports in peer-reviewed journals:

Additional plerixafor to granulocyte colony-stimulating factors for haematopoietic stem cell mobilisation for autologous transplantation in people with malignant lymphoma or multiple myeloma

Blood pressure lowering efficacy of renin inhibitors for primary hypertension

Interventions for cutaneous molluscum contagiosum

And learn more about the issues relevant to clinical research in the latest of our commemorating the event.

Post and find other relevant information and resources on Twitter by using the hashtag #ICTD2017.

Friday, May 19, 2017

Dying Matters Awareness Week

pon, 05/09/2016 - 04:00

13 - 19 May 2018 is Dying Matters Awareness Week. Every year in May, Dying Matters and its coalition members host an Awareness Week, which gives an opportunity to place the importance of talking about dying, death and bereavement firmly on the national agenda. The theme for 2019 is, "Are we ready?"

The Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Review Group produces reviews on palliative care for those with life-limiting disease or illness, and supportive care of patients and significant others living with serious illness. They have worked closely with Hospice UK, a national charity for hospice care, and the Dying Matters Coalition in order to share best evidence in palliative care during the Awareness Week.

The Cochrane evidence on this topic area are:

Other Related Resources:

Monday, May 13, 2019

Dying Matters Awareness Week

pon, 05/09/2016 - 04:00

14 - 20 May 2018 is Dying Matters Awareness Week. Every year in May, Dying Matters and its coalition members host an Awareness Week, which gives an opportunity to place the importance of talking about dying, death and bereavement firmly on the national agenda. The theme for 2018 is, "What Can You Do... in your community?"

The Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Review Group produces reviews on palliative care for those with life-limiting disease or illness, and supportive care of patients and significant others living with serious illness. They have been working closely with Hospice UK, a national charity for hospice care, and the Dying Matters Coalition in order to share best evidence in palliative care during the Awareness Week.

The Cochrane evidence on this topic area are:

Other Related Resources:

Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Wearing Cochrane evidence: a personal story of impact

čet, 01/07/2016 - 13:08

Rebecca Selby, a mum of four, shares how a Cochrane Review impacted her family.

When I unexpectedly went into premature labour with our second son at a little under 32 weeks' gestation, I was given steroid injections to give his lungs the best possible chance in the outside world. George spent almost a month in intensive care when he was born, spending some time on full ventilation and on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), to help him to breathe. Throughout his time in hospital, George developed a series of infections and I am sure that the boost to his lungs from the steroid medication is what gave him the ability to overcome these difficulties and ultimately saved his life. It is unlikely that George would be our 12-year-old little boy now without the treatment that he received, a fact for which we will all be eternally grateful!

In September 2015 I started at The University of Manchester to study Biology with Science and Society. I learned about the meaning behind the Cochrane logo while conducting research over the course of my studies. Each horizontal line within the logo represents the results of one study, while the diamond shape represents the combined results. The best estimate of whether the treatment is effective or harmful is established in this way, through systematic review. In the Cochrane logo, the diamond sits clearly to the left of the vertical line. The diamonds’ position represents that treatment does not contribute to negative outcomes, which indicates that the treatment is beneficial. The visual representation of these results, the “forest plot”, within the Cochrane logo illustrates a systematic review (originally published by Crowley et al. and subsequently updated) that was influential in increasing use of corticosteroids in women who are about to give birth prematurely. This simple intervention has probably saved thousands of premature babies – including George.

I was really drawn to the symbolism in this logo and the personal connection I have with it. The fact that all signs from the individual trials indicated that the treatment had little to no benefit until you step back and put all of the trial outcome information together in a systematic review is brilliant.  Sometimes you need to step back and look at the bigger picture!  My husband has since incorporated the inner circle of the Cochrane logo into a tattoo, as a physical reminder of our own little miracle of medical science.

Thank you to all the Cochrane reviewers for making a difference to the lives of families, including mine.

Rebecca Selby (@BeccaSelby)

 

Hear from George in this video, starting at 3:45

Friday, November 1, 2019 Category: The difference we make

Cochrane & Evidence Aid: resources for earthquakes

ned, 04/26/2015 - 20:08
This Cochrane Special Collection, developed in collaboration with Evidence Aid, includes Cochrane Reviews of healthcare topics that are important in the aftermath of a major earthquake. The reviews' conclusions are presented, along with signposts to systematic reviews that might be helpful to decision-makers. Topics covered: diarrhoea prevention and treatment; wound management; fracture management; physical trauma (excluding fractures); sepsis; anaesthesia; renal; chest infections; diseases caused by water-based insect vectors; mental health; neonatal health; child health and nutrition; and human resources for heallth. Access the full Special Collection on the Cochrane Library website. Monday, October 1, 2018

Stranice